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If Republicans Won’t Govern As Conservatives, Who Cares If There’s A ‘Red Wave’ In November?

There is a vast political swell among some ill-informed conservatives that the great mid-term elections will come and a tide of goodness (spelled R-E-P-U-B-L-I-C-A-N) will sweep over the grand land, providing what is often puerilely referred to as “American exceptionalism,” for everyone.

Everyone but conservatives, however. Yes, that’s what I meant.  Conservatives are republicans. Republicans are Republicans, and note the upper case “R”. They aren’t goodness or even good. They love lobbyists and their wars and printed money as much as their “loyal” opposition loves it. Conservatives are the few. Republicans and Democrats are the many.

They both live politically on the blood lust of “presentism” –look it up—but don’t reach for public teachers in any educational offering for it. Without it, the past is not, indeed, prologue.

Anyway,

Democrats probably are (d)emocrats, but are too unread, ill-bred and corrupt politically and academically to know they are. That is, they are indeed a mob but don’t realize it. They are truly a political land of The Lord of the Flies. Any given member could hoist the pig head on a stick.

So, conservatives, particularly Southerners who have not sold their souls to Republican yahoos or Democrat socialist/communists watch as the braggadocious Republicans, the Fox Channel-type pseudo-historians (presentism clods themselves) ballyhoo about great Republican red waves into the land of “a new beginning.” The other “media” conglomerates, meanwhile try to reach new minds with some new nonsense about some old nonsense or some new degeneracy that appeals to them. That was, of course, the social trail for the boys in The Lord of the Flies—nonsense to nonsense. And they did degenerate.

Meanwhile, conservatives, mostly Southerners though many are not, are saddled with the great onerousness of slavery; the “original sin” of America, they say. Of course, what they mean is the South’s great sin.

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For many, this fabled “sin” is one of the great nonsense traps lain out by both political parties. Though the Democrats have a firm grip on nonsense, the Republicans tag along trying to draw votes from the publicly educated draught of mindless mush they help create. They play with fire. These are the same Republicans that bought the South and conservatism with Barry Goldwater, then sold it to Richard Nixon. Ronald Reagan had a chance to buy it back but his check bounced when he allowed Mel Bradford to be bounced.

Perhaps the saddest echo as a result of Republicans playing with fire is often seen in church. Too often, many of the grand “march-across- the- stage” pastors attempt subtle (Democrats are openly political in church) ahistorical speeches that are either downright lies or just downright uneducated concepts.

Right here in Houston, a pastor from one of the largest megachurch congregations danced across the stage a couple of years ago with his pitiful little nonsense that slave owners, like abortionists, could murder. James Henry Thornwell, this guy ain’t. But he still packs them in despite his “historical” nonsense.

People like this ought to be ashamed to speak in public, let alone fawn fecklessly over the Gospels. Though I would withhold my stone, albeit moving my letter.

But the political markers for the South are marked by the “media” as to stay with the Republicans (red state, red state, red state). They are conservative, they say. They can lead you to a new “exceptionalism.” The South always has been exceptional. Republicans have never been so. They are politicians—as was their father-Abraham. Father of our nation, destroyer of our republic. Destruction is never exceptional, except at places like Hiroshima

Yes, follow through with Republican conservative guys, of course, like the rubes of Republican retort: Lindsey Graham, Mitch McConnell, Trey (got my Fox gig) Gowdy, or for those Democrat-Republicans such as Romney, Murkowski, Cheney, et al.

Golly, it gives me goosebumps thinking about all that “conservative” gray matter.

Perhaps Jesus Christ had Republicans in mind when he said “There will be wars and rumors of wars.”

Now, this is something that that mega-church slave expert mentioned above could get his sermon teeth into. And he could still slide across his personal stage. If he cares.

So, there may be a red wave or a Republican wave but there will not be a conservative wave. There aren’t enough to make a wave (or waves).

Like George Wallace from many years back, Donald Trump is a single guy wavemaker. And Trump is a heck of a lot of fun to watch when he calls both Democrats and Republicans what they are. Pick your own Trump comment for that conclusion. Whatever bad he said about them is probably so.

The problem with the comparison is that Trump may not fully understand that what Governor Wallace said is as true now as it ever has been,

“There ain’t a dime’s worth of difference between the two.”

And there ain’t.

The only aberrant thoughts are from a modicum of conservatives who mostly live down south.

We, indeed, are a band of brothers— and native to the soil.

By Paul Yarbrough

Paul Yarbrough is a regular contributor to The Blue State Conservative. He writes novels, short stories, poetry, and essays. His first novel. Mississippi Cotton is a Kindle bestseller. His author site can be found on Amazon. He writes political commentary for CommDigiNews.

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The views and opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of The Blue State Conservative. The BSC is not responsible for, and does not verify the accuracy of, any information presented.

Featured photo by Billy Hathorn, CC BY 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons